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Silence is the Enemy

June 2, 2009, 10:49 am — admin (Uncategorized)

rwanda4I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, stomach it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, discount rx where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, decease it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, remedy it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, allergist it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, healing where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, more about it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, pills where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, denture to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, more about it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, pills where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, denture to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.

George Tiller, decease
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, more about it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, pills where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, denture to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.

George Tiller, decease
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.

George Tiller, ampoule
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, look
was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, more about it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, pills where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, denture to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.

George Tiller, decease
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.

George Tiller, ampoule
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, look
was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.

George Tiller, more about
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, neuropathist
was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.
rwanda2I  want to share something that I saw last fall that was breathtaking and heartbreaking and so powerful, more about it rendered me speechless.  I went to the Moving Walls 14 photo exhibition at the Open Society’s midtown office with my photography class, pills where we viewed several series of images shot by different photographers. Subject matter varied from the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, denture to the oil fields in the Niger Delta.  There was one series, however, that consumed me–where I found my feet planted, too heavy to lift, and so I stood there equally captivated by the beauty of the images and horrified by the story behind them.  The photographer is Jonathan Torgovnik and in this exhibit, Intended Consequences, he photographed women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide with the children they bore as a result.  The combination of image and text offers a raw look at the complex horror that is the reality of these women’s lives–it goes beyond just the brutality of sexual violence and extends to the internal battle between loving their child and resenting them for what they represent.

OSI’s gallery is now showing Moving Walls 15, but you can see Intended Consequences on OSI’s website. Click here.

George Tiller, decease
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.

George Tiller, ampoule
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, look
was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.

George Tiller, more about
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, neuropathist
was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.

George Tiller, ask
one of only a few doctors in the nation who performed abortions late in pregnancy, viagra 40mg
was shot to death here Sunday in the foyer of his longtime church as he handed out the church bulletin.

Full story.
Great post today on Aetiology about the intersection of rape, denture war, remedy and public health.

Sometimes there comes a public health issue that’s so big, so overwhelming, so heinous, that you just don’t know where to begin discussing it. Nevertheless, the conversation should, and must, happen just the same. Silence may be easier, but speaking out is the only way to demystify the taboos and bring attention to what’s going on for those who can’t bring attention to it themselves. And maybe, just maybe, bring about some change.

This month a coalition of blogs is donating all their income to Doctors Without Borders.  We don’t make any income from this blog, but please consider making a donation.

2 Comments »

  1. [...] blog listed here, email me.  The facebook group will soon surpass 4,000 members and the official website is close to [...]

    Pingback by The Web Just Got Louder | The Intersection | Discover Magazine — June 5, 2009 @ 5:26 pm

  2. [...] New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault [...]

    Pingback by Do You Know The Enemy? | The Intersection | Discover Magazine — June 19, 2009 @ 9:14 am

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