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Alliance at Inaugural SAY SO! Brooklyn Event

April 27, 2010, 3:42 pm — admin (Uncategorized)

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The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, online strikes, and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.
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The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, anorexia strikes, viagra sale and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.
The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, ambulance strikes, ailment and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, healing and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.

The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, epidemic strikes, and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.

The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, urologist strikes, and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.

The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, urologist strikes, and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.
As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, viagra approved
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, viagra
I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

The Center for Anti-violence Education: Building Strength to End Violence

It’s much more than blocks, urologist strikes, and de-escalation techniques. It’s helping to enhance, and in some cases rebuild, a sense of personal boundaries, rights, and power. When we locate our own value and right to be safe, we can better work towards that for others.”

– Former CAE student and current self-defense instructor

Over our 35 years serving Brooklyn and the larger NYC community, The Center for Anti-violence Education (CAE) has lived through and fought for so many changes. While public awareness and discussion around issues of violence has grown, the fact is that violence against women, LGBT communities, people of color, and young people continues. And so CAE continues to expand the scope and reach of our vital programs as we work towards a just and peaceful world.

In 1974, Annie Ellman and Nadia Telsey co-founded CAE, then known as Brooklyn Women’s Martial Arts (BWMA). They envisioned a women’s karate school that would foster skills, strength, and community, and connect martial arts training for women with an anti-violence, anti-racist perspective.

Thirty-five years after our first classes were held in our founder’s living room, we are a city and nationwide leader in violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs. Today we offer a wide range of programs at our Brooklyn location, and throughout the five boroughs of New York City at schools, community groups, shelters, rape crisis centers, workplaces, and more. We also serve as consultants for organizations across the country. Sliding scale fees, free childcare, and free programs for survivors of violence make our programs accessible.

Since our founding, CAE has been a vital resource for survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, hate/bias crimes, and harassment. For many, the capacity for self-care, interviewing for a job, having a healthy relationship, or parenting have been diminished, and in some cases, shattered.

Through a combination of physical activities, role plays, and discussions, individuals counter and heal from the debilitating effects of violence. Participants practice using their voices, learn to speak out on their own behalf, and regain a sense of personal power. Learning physical techniques increases assertiveness and builds strength to counter feelings of shame and powerlessness caused by previous abuse.

We hear from women and LGBT survivors how our transformative programs go beyond counseling, empowering them to address the complex issues they face. In the words of a former participant, “CAE restores to survivors something that is often lacking in other forums—a connection between mind, body, and spirit that was severed for most women when they were assaulted.”

We all know that young people today face a range of violence from bullying to street harassment to relationship abuse. National research demonstrates that one in three high school women experiences some type of abuse in her dating relationships. Additionally, last year saw multiple reports of young people who killed themselves because of anti-gay bullying and harassment. Over 30% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Living and working on the streets, they face even greater risk.

By reaching young people, we can actively break cycles of violence. CAE’s youth programs teach practical strategies for safety, foster respect for diversity, and instill the importance of community involvement. Young people in our programs become forces for change in their communities. One teen student remarked, “This class was an amazing and empowering experience. I feel like my self-esteem has jumped 10 spaces higher than when I started.” A student in our children’s program shared, “CAE is a place to express myself. I learned how to protect my body, how to be more confident, and more empathetic. CAE has helped me to become a stronger person inside and out.”

After participating in CAE’s teen program, a young woman recognized that her mother was involved in an abusive relationship, and told her so. Her mother soon called CAE and said, “I think I need your help.” This is just one example of the power of CAE’s intergenerational programs to impact individuals and families.

Where can you learn self-defense techniques, bask in the green and warmth of lovely Prospect Park, win prizes, and punch to 1,000 with members of our community, all to support survivors of violence? CAE’s 5th annual Punch-a-thon!  Join us, Saturday June 6th. Click here for more details.

To learn more about CAE’s programs, history, and philosophy visit: www.caeny.org

.
As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, viagra approved
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, viagra
I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org
As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, diagnosis
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, health I’m often asked, psychotherapist
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

Guest Blog Written By: Oraia Reid
Executive Director, grip Founder
RightRides for Women’s Safety

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

Guest Blog Written By: Oraia Reid
Executive Director, grip Founder
RightRides for Women’s Safety

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, look
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, advice
I’m often asked, plague
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

Guest Blog Written By: Oraia Reid
Executive Director, grip Founder
RightRides for Women’s Safety

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, look
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, advice
I’m often asked, plague
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, viagra order
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, diagnosis I’m often asked, esophagitis
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

Guest Blog Written By: Oraia Reid
Executive Director, grip Founder
RightRides for Women’s Safety

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, look
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, advice
I’m often asked, plague
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, viagra order
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, diagnosis I’m often asked, esophagitis
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org
As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, visit this
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, ask
I’m often asked, clinic
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

Guest Blog Written By: Oraia Reid
Executive Director, grip Founder
RightRides for Women’s Safety

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, I’m often asked, “What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, look
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, advice
I’m often asked, plague
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org

As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, viagra order
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, diagnosis I’m often asked, esophagitis
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org
As the Executive Director and Founder of a progressive, visit this
grassroots organization addressing gender-based violence, ask
I’m often asked, clinic
“What are some of your biggest challenges?”   As anyone working in a nonprofit will likely tell you, limited capacity and funding are key challenges.  This is equally true for me and my organization, but an overarching challenge I face is engaging supporters and the general public in understanding the impact of sexual violence on the full spectrum of our constituents.  This includes not only women but Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Gender Nonconforming (LGBTQGNC) individuals and those embracing other gender-identities.

Experiencing sexual violence is incredibly traumatic, no matter one’s identity, but for LGBTQGNC folks, it is perhaps more acute.  Many individuals in these communities experience frequent predatory assaults, hate crimes and random acts of violence just because they identify outside of societies two gender bias.  Oftentimes, they are repeatedly assaulted, and do not have fair access to necessary services or just representation within traditional support systems such as law enforcement or by medical professionals.  In fact, many of these institutions may be further traumatizing for these survivors trying to seek help, because of the lack of sensitivity or proper training, lack of resources to work with and serve the needs of diverse survivors, or frequently, because of homo- or trans-phobia.

In light of this, we’re working to build safer communities and ensuring safe access to equitable transportation for all people.  My organization, as well as our flagship RightRides program, began in 2004, in direct response to an increase in sexual assaults targeting women traveling home alone at night in Brooklyn neighborhoods.  RightRides quickly expanded to serve all LGBTQGNC individuals, who are equally a violence-targeted community.

RightRides is entirely volunteer-run service, offering free, late night rides home on Friday and Saturday nights in up to 45 New York City neighborhoods, across four boroughs.   Nearly 3,000 individuals have received safe passage home since 2004, thanks to 150 driving team volunteers operating six cars donated by our vehicle sponsor Zipcar.

RightRides motto is, “Because Getting Home Safely Shouldn’t Be A Luxury”.  All too often, only those with financial wealth are able to ensure their own safe commute at all hours of the day and night by paying for taxis or expensive car services.  On the other hand, for individuals with limited funds or resources, public transit is the only affordable option, forcing vulnerable people to take the train or bus and then walk home.  Gender-based discrimination and violence occurs all too frequently on mass transit itself, and the areas we conduct core programs in are often desolate and poorly lit late at night, which can foster predatory opportunities for assault for those walking from public transit.

My organization is also a founding member of New Yorkers for Safe Transit (NYFST), the only coalition in New York City dedicated to ending gender-based discrimination, harassment and assault on public transportation.   NYFST is working to build the power of traditionally oppressed communities, particularly women, communities of color, the LGBTQGNC community and low-income individuals to fight for policies that will create safer environments in the mass transit system.

Throughout our organization and programs, we strive to understand and address the safety needs of those most at-risk for gender-based violence, with respect and dignity that all humans deserve.  To learn more about our work, please visit www.RightRides.org and www.NYFST.org
The Alliance was among many organizations represented at the first-ever SAY SO! Brooklyn (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out) on Tuesday, information pills
April 20th. Nestled between stories of survivors, steroids
activists, cialis and service providers, Kira Laffe, Training and Outreach Coordinator for the Alliance, offered a brief history about the event:

“SAY SO! began in 2003 as a project of the Alliance. It began as an awareness event, bringing to light the fact that sexual violence happens often and happens to us, our friends, our loved ones. It provided information and resources about what to do if sexual violence occurred, and for many attendees, was the first time hearing about free counseling and advocacy services available to the community. SAY SO! grew and became more than just an awareness event, it was awareness event that also focused attention on celebrating the healing journey of survivors. SAY SO! brought a face to sexual violence and united survivors, supporters, activists and community members in a pursuit of healing.”

The Alliance's Kira Laffe speaks at SAY SO! Brooklyn 2010.


SAY SO! has continued to evolve over the years; instead of holding SAY SO! in a centralized location each year, the Alliance found it important to bring SAY SO! to the community. In 2008, the Alliance gave wings to the project, encouraging each borough to hold their own SAY SO! event. With technical assistance from the Alliance, Staten Island was the first borough to pilot the project, and Brooklyn followed with this year’s event. Both events were organized and hosted by Safe Horizon’s respective Rape and Sexual Assault Programs.

We encourage you to visit the SAY SO! Brooklyn blog for more information and photos of the event. Please contact the Alliance if you are interested in hosting your own SAY SO! event.

41 Comments »

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