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Guest blog: Emily from HollabackNYC

April 30, 2010, 11:03 am — admin (Uncategorized)

Through Our Own Eyes: NYC Youth Envisioning A City Without Sexual & Dating Violence
Through Our Own Eyes: NYC Youth Envisioning A City Without Sexual & Dating Violence
The Power to End Street Harassment in the Palm of Your Hand

HollabackNYC started in 2005 the way a lot of good revolutions must begin – as conversations with friends over a couple of drinks. The seven of us commiserated over being whistled at, visit this site
cat-called, abortion
and propositioned, here
with each story earning a chorus of “uggg” “ewww” and “gross!”

The trouble was that we felt there was nothing we could do. If we walked on, we felt victimized. If we yelled, we felt angry. Witty comebacks had their charm, but they always came late, and street harassment was more or less protected under laws of free speech. Then we realized – why not take pictures of these street harassers and post them on a blog? And so, with the clink of our cocktail glasses, we launched HollabackNYC, a blog dedicated to giving women an empowered response to street harassment.

Since then, I have had the opportunity to watch the anti-street harassment movement grow worldwide.  Hollaback now has sites in eight cities across the world, with new sites popping up in London and Hong Kong this month.  Hollaback has outgrown its blog status, and in May I’ll become the first executive director.

Over the past five years I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about street harassment.  What I’ve learned is that street harassment is on a spectrum of violence against women.  Although it is less intense than other forms, it is oftentimes more pervasive.  Many women report being street harassed three, four, even five times a day.  And unlike many forms of violence against women, street harassment happens in public.  For every woman that is harassed, there is a man watching her.  For every woman that doesn’t speak up, there is a man thinking, well – if she didn’t say anything it must be OK.  And if harassment is OK, then maybe groping is OK.  And if groping is OK, then maybe beating is OK.  And if beating is OK, then maybe rape it OK.  Boys, I’m here to break it to you: violence against women simply isn’t OK.

Ladies, we’ve got to end violence against women were it starts.  I know it’s not always easy to Hollaback and let’s face it: you shouldn’t have to.  You should be able to walk down the street and feel safe, confident, and sexy, without the threat of harassment.   Staying silent is easier, but it doesn’t get us any closer to the world we want to create.

We’re launching a new website and iPhone app so that we can map when and where street harassment happens.  Then we’re going to use that data – which will be the first of its kind – to end it.  We have a hunch that if we can end street harassment, we can put a serious dent in all forms of violence against women.

The women who came before us dramatically decreased harassment in the workplace in the 1980s.  Now, in the 2010’s it’s our turn to decrease harassment on the streets.  Let’s Hollaback now so our daughters don’t have to.

To help make this all possible and to learn more: click here: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hollaback/hollaback

Exciting Initiative Part 2

April 16, 2010, 9:00 am — admin (Uncategorized)

Come check out another upcoming Alliance event:


This morning I attended a special members briefing, decease Sexual Violence Prevention: Community Based Organizations at the Forefront of Interventions for Families, purchase Workplace and Neighborhoods, held at Philanthropy New York.

Two out of the four speakers were Alliance staff members:Executive Director Harriet Lessel & Director of Program Meghan O’Connor, which made it extra exciting (at least for me!).

Attendees at the event also had the chance to hear from Oraia the founder of RightRides, and Kim from AVP.

I thought it was a really interesting event.

The moderator was fabulous, everyone had interesting presentations, and it was really thought-provoking to learn how different organizations are working to support survivors of sexual assault and prevent these acts from occurring.

The participants at the briefing included staff members from advocacy organizations, foundations, and research institutions.

I think that everyone had a great morning, and I’m hopeful that there will be another briefing sometime soon.
This morning I attended a special members briefing held at Philanthropy New York.

Speakers included the Alliance’s Executive Director, herbal Harriet, look and the Director of progr

Sexual Violence Prevention: Community Based Organizations at the Forefront of Interventions for Families, Workplace and Neighborhoodss
This morning I attended a special members briefing held at Philanthropy New York.

Two out of the four speakers were Alliance staff members:Executive Director Harriet Lessel & Director of Program Meghann O’Connor, viagra 100mg which made it extra exciting (at least for me!).
This morning I attended a special members briefing, endocrinologist Sexual Violence Prevention: Community Based Organizations at the Forefront of Interventions for Families, apoplectic Workplace and Neighborhoods, diagnosis held at Philanthropy New York.

Two out of the four speakers were Alliance staff members:Executive Director Harriet Lessel & Director of Program Meghann O’Connor, which made it extra exciting (at least for me!).

Attendees at the event also had the chance to hear from Oraia the founder of RightRides, and Kim from AVP.

I thought it was a really interesting event.

The moderator was fabulous, everyone had interesting presentations, and it was really thought-provoking to learn how different organizations are working to support survivors of sexual assault and prevent these acts from occuring.

The particpants at the briefing included staff members from advocacy organizations, foundations, and research intistuations.

I think that everyone had a great morning, and I’m hopeful tha
This morning I attended a special members briefing, geriatrician Sexual Violence Prevention: Community Based Organizations at the Forefront of Interventions for Families, viagra Workplace and Neighborhoods, held at Philanthropy New York.

Two out of the four speakers were Alliance staff members:Executive Director Harriet Lessel & Director of Program Meghan O’Connor, which made it extra exciting (at least for me!).

Attendees at the event also had the chance to hear from Oraia the founder of RightRides, and Kim from AVP.

I thought it was a really interesting event.

The moderator was fabulous, everyone had interesting presentations, and it was really thought-provoking to learn how different organizations are working to support survivors of sexual assault and prevent these acts from occurring.

The participants at the briefing included staff members from advocacy organizations, foundations, and research institutions.

I think that everyone had a great morning, and I’m hopeful that there will be another briefing sometime soon.
This morning I attended a special members briefing, viagra 60mg Sexual Violence Prevention: Community Based Organizations at the Forefront of Interventions for Families, approved Workplace and Neighborhoods, population health held at Philanthropy New York.

Two out of the four speakers were Alliance staff members:Executive Director Harriet Lessel & Director of Program Meghan O’Connor, which made it extra exciting (at least for me!).

Attendees at the event also had the chance to hear from Oraia the founder of RightRides, and Kim from AVP.

I thought it was a really interesting event.

The moderator was fabulous, everyone had interesting presentations, and it was really thought-provoking to learn how different organizations are working to support survivors of sexual assault and prevent these acts from occurring.

The participants at the briefing included staff members from advocacy organizations, foundations, and research institutions.

I think that everyone had a great morning, and I’m hopeful that there will be another briefing sometime soon.
This morning I attended a special members briefing, viagra 60mg Sexual Violence Prevention: Community Based Organizations at the Forefront of Interventions for Families, approved Workplace and Neighborhoods, population health held at Philanthropy New York.

Two out of the four speakers were Alliance staff members:Executive Director Harriet Lessel & Director of Program Meghan O’Connor, which made it extra exciting (at least for me!).

Attendees at the event also had the chance to hear from Oraia the founder of RightRides, and Kim from AVP.

I thought it was a really interesting event.

The moderator was fabulous, everyone had interesting presentations, and it was really thought-provoking to learn how different organizations are working to support survivors of sexual assault and prevent these acts from occurring.

The participants at the briefing included staff members from advocacy organizations, foundations, and research institutions.

I think that everyone had a great morning, and I’m hopeful that there will be another briefing sometime soon.
Back in December we had Lauren (the organizing intern here @ the Alliance) guest blog about our newest advocacy initiative! (link it: http://www.svfreenyc.org/blog/2009/12/21/exciting-initiative-part-1/)

Well, capsule Lauren is back to give us an update on the project.

Here is the 2nd of Lauren’s guest posts:

Since we launched our citywide advocacy initiative, more about
we have recruited some amazing volunteers throughout New York City to participate in the project.  These people are Rape Crisis Advocates, students, activists and members of the community committed to eliminating sexual violence!

After the volunteers participated in a training back in January, I started scheduling meetings with City Council members.  At these meetings, staff from the Alliance was accompanied by various volunteers to speak out about what they have seen as rape crisis advocates, as well as, what they have seen (and not seen) in their communities and schools.  Thank you to everyone who participated in these meetings for your passion, commitment and courage to speak out about sexual violence.

So far, we have met with quite a few Council Members and their staff already.  We have already met with Councilmember Maria del Carmen Arroyo, Seth Barron, Legislative Aide of Councilmember Julissa Ferreras’ Office, Jonathan Chung, Legislative Director of Councilmember Peter Vallone’s Office and CM Crowley.  The commitment and passion that these Council Members and their staff have for their work and to sexual violence initiatives is truly commendable and we are so happy to have the opportunity to collaborate with them!

We have a meeting set up with Councilmember Inez Dickens’ Office and hope to schedule as many as we can before the release of the FY2011 budget.

Another part of the campaign that was just launched this week is the letter writing campaign initiative.  We are reaching out to people to sign on to our petition to urge City Council Members to support funding for the Council’s Sexual Assault and Citywide Initiatives.  The petition can be found here and I urge all of our readers to read it, sign it and forward it to everyone you know.  Sexual Violence is a public health and human rights issue that affects everyone in our community!

If anyone is interested in getting involved or receiving more information, contact lkurtz@svfreenyc.org

Esther Chavez–the Ciudad Juarez activist dies

January 5, 2010, 9:00 am — admin (Uncategorized)

Every year Change.org creates a top 10 list of things members helped accomplish over the past year.

This year we were pretty excited to see sexual violence topics take up 2 places on this list.

Coming in @ #9, shop neuropathist they listed:

9. Chicago Tribune Columnist Apologizes for Blaming Rape Victim
Just last month a nationally syndicated female advice columnist responded to a young woman who was raped at a fraternity party and asking advice by writing: “Were you a victim? Yes…you were a victim of your own awful judgment.” This sort of outrageous victim blaming is one of the reasons why the majority of rapes go unreported, and in response Change.org members and bloggers across the web sent 5000 letters in protest to columnist Amy Dickenson and the Chicago Tribune, forcing Ms. Dickenson to respond publicly, apologize for the statement, and make it clear that she did not mean to blame the victim. Although we’d like Amy and the Chicago Tribune to go much further in addressing the issue, the Change.org community sent a clear message that victim blaming by the media will no longer go unaddressed.

I was particualry excited to see this issue make the list, as victim blaming does often go unnoticed or unaddressed. Sexual violence is so pervasive, that we sometimes forget that simply pointing out the dangerous biases of others is an important way to combat this problem. Good job  change.org for mobilizing supporters, and for highlighting this important issue!

Change.org also included this @ #10:

10. Choice Hotels Commits to Enhance Preventative Human Trafficking Measures
One of the tragic stories we reported on this fall was that of five-year-old Shaniya Davis, who was sold for sex in a Comfort Inn in North Carolina shortly before her body was found on the side of the road. Comfort Inn is owned by the hotel conglomerate Choice Hotels, which has avoided signing a widely embraced code of conduct administered by the international organization ECPAT and funded by UNICEF to prevent child prostitution in the travel industry. After we wrote about the story we got in touch with ECPAT and launched a campaign demanding that Choice Hotels embrace the code of conduct, leading thousands of Change.org activists to send messages to Choice Hotels’ CEO within days of the article. Although initially resistant, Choice Hotels eventually agreed to have a conversation with ECPAT and is now committed to taking further steps to ensure its hotels aren’t again used for child prostitution.

I had not actually heard about this campaign before reading their list, but I’m really happy to hear that domestic trafficking work is gaining some momentum. Perhaps I’ll find out a little more information about this particular incident and blog about it in the new year.

When dealing with sexual violence it can sometimes be hard to be positive–so I think it’s great to see a national organiza
Every year Change.org creates a top 10 list of things members helped accomplish over the past year.

This year we were pretty excited to see sexual violence topics take up 2 places on this list.

Coming in @ #9, global burden of disease they listed:

9. Chicago Tribune Columnist Apologizes for Blaming Rape Victim
Just last month a nationally syndicated female advice columnist responded to a young woman who was raped at a fraternity party and asking advice by writing: “Were you a victim? Yes…you were a victim of your own awful judgment.” This sort of outrageous victim blaming is one of the reasons why the majority of rapes go unreported, sildenafil and in response Change.org members and bloggers across the web sent 5000 letters in protest to columnist Amy Dickenson and the Chicago Tribune, forcing Ms. Dickenson to respond publicly, apologize for the statement, and make it clear that she did not mean to blame the victim. Although we’d like Amy and the Chicago Tribune to go much further in addressing the issue, the Change.org community sent a clear message that victim blaming by the media will no longer go unaddressed.

I was particularly excited to see this issue make the list, as victim blaming does often go unnoticed or unaddressed. Sexual violence is so pervasive, that we sometimes forget that simply pointing out the dangerous biases of others is an important way to combat this problem. Good job  change.org for mobilizing supporters, and for highlighting this important issue!

Change.org also included this @ #10:

10. Choice Hotels Commits to Enhance Preventative Human Trafficking Measures
One of the tragic stories we reported on this fall was that of five-year-old Shaniya Davis, who was sold for sex in a Comfort Inn in North Carolina shortly before her body was found on the side of the road. Comfort Inn is owned by the hotel conglomerate Choice Hotels, which has avoided signing a widely embraced code of conduct administered by the international organization ECPAT and funded by UNICEF to prevent child prostitution in the travel industry. After we wrote about the story we got in touch with ECPAT and launched a campaign demanding that Choice Hotels embrace the code of conduct, leading thousands of Change.org activists to send messages to Choice Hotels’ CEO within days of the article. Although initially resistant, Choice Hotels eventually agreed to have a conversation with ECPAT and is now committed to taking further steps to ensure its hotels aren’t again used for child prostitution.

I had not actually heard about this campaign before reading their list, but I’m really happy to hear that domestic trafficking work is gaining some momentum. Perhaps I’ll find out a little more information about this particular incident and blog about it in the new year.

When dealing with sexual violence it can sometimes be hard to be positive–so I think it’s great to see a national organization touting their good work in this area!

Maybe the Alliance can come up with their own top 10 list in 2010!
This may be a bit of inside baseball, bulimics but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, illness Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, apoplectic director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

This may be a bit of inside baseball, gynecologist but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

This may be a bit of inside baseball, gynecologist but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

Good article in the Times today about runaways:

“The number of these kids keeps increasing, psychiatrist
services for them keep decreasing and tracking of them is totally insufficient, viagra 100mg
” said Casey Trupin, a professor at the University of Washington law school who helped write the new guidelines. “We figured it was time to get involved because arresting and charging these youth is not helping them escape the streets.”

This may be a bit of inside baseball, malady but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, ed Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, psychiatrist director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

This may be a bit of inside baseball, mind but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

This may be a bit of inside baseball, mind but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

Good article in the Times today about runaways:

“The number of these kids keeps increasing, weight loss
services for them keep decreasing and tracking of them is totally insufficient, approved
” said Casey Trupin, ask a professor at the University of Washington law school who helped write the new guidelines. “We figured it was time to get involved because arresting and charging these youth is not helping them escape the streets.”

This may be a bit of inside baseball, mind but it’s worth a few minutes to set the record straight.

In a post that’s widely referenced and linked, Paul Migenoff writes:

But here’s my favorite part of the story. Ada Gregory, director of the Women’s Center, argues that “higher IQ males” like those who populate Duke are particularly effective at “manipulation and coercion.” Hence their ability to “rape” women without them even realizing it.

It is my understanding that Duke also admits “higher IQ females.” But if you’re a radical feminist, women must always be clueless and helpless, no matter how intelligent they might seem.

Of course it’s a misquote, but it took a bit of hunting to find the original.  To make it a little easier for the next person, here’s the full text of Ms. Gregory’s comments on the subject.

Comment on rape policy not aimed at all students

I applaud The Chronicle for writing about Duke’s revision to the sexual misconduct policy Aug. 28, “Rape policy mandates reporting.” The University is taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety of the community and that certainly deserves attention from the student body. However, a quote attributed to me – “The higher IQ, the more manipulative they are, the more cunning they are… imagine the sex offenders we have here at Duke – cream of the crop” – was neither accurate in the context of our conversation nor did it refect my views, and could in fact harm our efforts to address the problem of sexual misconduct.

The diffculty in detecting and investigating sexual assault cases, particularly acquaintance rapes, which are often committed by undetected rapists who use manipulation and coercion, has been shown by the research of David Lisak, a University of Massachusetts at Boston clinical psychologist, and others. The investigations of these crimes can be further complicated by offenders who may also be categorized as antisocial or sociopathic, who are of above-average intelligence and can be highly manipulative and coercive, not only with victims but in the investigation process.

Universities gather a lot of people with above average intel-ligence, so it stands to reason that campuses might see more of these kinds of individuals than the general population. My comments about this complex issue were selectively edited and taken out of context to imply that all Duke students ft this pattern, which is emphatically not the case.

To be clear, the only policy change is the requirement that Duke employees and students acting for the university (such as RAs and FACs) are obligated to report to the Offce of Student Conduct incidents of sexual misconduct when they become aware of them. This has long been a legal requirement when employees report sexual misconduct and is now extended to students.

I hope this issue does not detract from the important dialogues that are occurring across the campus.

Ada Gregory, Women’s Center director

Good article in the Times today about runaways:

“The number of these kids keeps increasing, weight loss
services for them keep decreasing and tracking of them is totally insufficient, approved
” said Casey Trupin, ask a professor at the University of Washington law school who helped write the new guidelines. “We figured it was time to get involved because arresting and charging these youth is not helping them escape the streets.”

Good article in the Times today about runaways:

“The number of these kids keeps increasing, apoplexy
services for them keep decreasing and tracking of them is totally insufficient,” said Casey Trupin, a professor at the University of Washington law school who helped write the new guidelines. “We figured it was time to get involved because arresting and charging these youth is not helping them escape the streets.”

And yet another link to a NYTimes article..this one about the  life of Esther Chavez.

Esther Chavez is best known for bringing international attention to the violence against women that permeated her home Ciudad Juarez. She also founded a shelter for victims of violence, treat Casa Amiga, to serve the women of the city.

Ciudad Jaurez became famous, or rather, infamous after Chavez helped publicize the fact that starting in the 1990s, over 100 women from the city were  strangled and then dumped  in the desert or vacant lots. Little had been done to stem the tide of violence or bring the perpetrators to justice.

Chavez “worked tirelessly to denounce the decade-long string of killings and to demand that the deaths be properly investigated. Most of the victims were young and many worked at border assembly factories known as maquiladoras.”

I think it’s great that the Times took the time to honor the life and work of Esther Chavez.  It’s pretty incredible to think that  such widespread violence against women was occurring with so little attention, and that one woman was able to impact an entire city.

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Blog posts are the responsibility of their authors, and do not reflect the opinions of the New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

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