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#ididnotreport

March 21, 2012, 4:48 pm — admin (Uncategorized)

Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, treat this web nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, prostate as well as, prescription for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, rx nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, as well as, for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
National Sexual Violence Resource Center Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, generic who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.



National Sexual Violence Resource Center Executive Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, sickness who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, viagra and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.data.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center Executive Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, ailment who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, buy and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, medications Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center Executive Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, dosage who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, visit web and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, dosage Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center Executive Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, sales who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, refractionist and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, physician Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.



National Sexual Violence Resource Center Executive Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, side effects who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, buy information pills and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.



National Sexual Violence Resource Center Executive Director Karen Baker –one of our distinguished panel speakers at James X– published a response to a Washington Post editorial by Christina Hoff Sommers, overweight who accused the CDC of overstating the prevalence of sexual violence in the recent NISVS findings.  Sommers called the study “careless advocacy research.”

Author of Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women, and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men, Sommers challenges the CDC’s methodology and “advocacy agenda,” criticizing the 2010 NISVS report’s “inflated statistics and sensationalism.”  In a sensational turn of her own, Sommers offers her own interpretation of the striking findings on the scope of victimization: She writes, “the CDC effectively set a stage where each step of physical intimacy required a notarized testament of sober consent.”

Karen Baker’s response, issued in a press release titled, “I wish it were true that sexual violence is being overstated,” very thoughtfully addresses each of Sommers’ criticisms, including deviations from previous national estimates and law enforcement data, and complaints with the study’s survey instrument.  Where Sommers accuses the CDC of carelessness and ambiguity in their definition of sexual violence, Baker underscores the strengths of the methodology when it comes to allowing participants to define their own experiences of victimization to accurately measure a range of sexually violent behaviors.  She writes, “I really wish that Christina Hoff Sommers’ assessment was correct and that the problem is not really that big; unfortunately the facts don’t seem to be pointing in that direction.”  Baker concludes, “the sooner we get our heads out of the sand and accept that reality, the sooner we can begin working together to find effective solutions.”

Sommers views NISVS as an attempt to steer “scarce resources in the wrong direction,” and challenges the SV prevention field’s emphasis on programs that address “sexism, stereotypes and social structures.”  I believe that Karen Baker and the NSVRC’s response to Sommers’ assessment is a perfect example of the way we can hold journalists and the media accountable for their role in reinforcing harmful notions of power and dangerous norms about societal tolerance of violence.


Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, order nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, no rx as well as, for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, ampoule nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, implant as well as, visit web for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, ampoule nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, implant as well as, visit web for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
A November 15th article in the NY Times Arts section, psychotherapist
Female Comedians, medicine Breaking the Taste-Taboo Ceiling,” highlights supposed progress made in stand-up comedy, in which female comedians now tread a previously male-dominated line between cultural taboos and poor taste when it comes to laughing about rape.  Author Jason Zinoman credits comedian Sarah Silverman’s signature rape jokes as the vanguard, describing them as a “breakthrough for this new generation of female comedians.”

Jokes about nonconsensual sex, of course, are older than the oldest stand-up comedy routines: Citing any comedian as a pioneer in this territory only marks the time when it became socially unacceptable to tell them.  The article’s title evokes progress made in a movement to advance the rights of female comedians, and Zinoman praises Silverman’s success in proving that “there are areas of aggressive, shocking comedy where women could go further than men.”  However, his attempt to chronicle a new trend, in which violent humor is somehow being “reclaimed” by women, serves only to conflate equal access to rape jokes with progress for women, instead of recognizing it as a setback for everyone.  The way I understand it, there is simply a new class of rape-joke-apologists—including Silverman, Tina Fey, Whitney Cummings, Phoebe Robinson and Amy Schumer—that just happen to be women.

These routines reinforce destructive social norms that dismiss rape as an inevitable—even amusing—part of life, minimizing its harm and even attributing blame to victims.  As my colleague at the Alliance said, this article reads like a legitimization of rape jokes, as if the meaning of them is validated simply by their presence in the New York Times.

So, even though I applaud some of the above-named women for attempting to challenge gender stereotypes, I can’t say that I applaud their courage when it comes to rape jokes, because rape jokes aren’t “risky” for comedians: rape jokes are risky for all of us.

Laura Fidler
Research and Project Coordinator

Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, ampoule nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, implant as well as, visit web for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
A November 15th article in the NY Times Arts section, psychotherapist
Female Comedians, medicine Breaking the Taste-Taboo Ceiling,” highlights supposed progress made in stand-up comedy, in which female comedians now tread a previously male-dominated line between cultural taboos and poor taste when it comes to laughing about rape.  Author Jason Zinoman credits comedian Sarah Silverman’s signature rape jokes as the vanguard, describing them as a “breakthrough for this new generation of female comedians.”

Jokes about nonconsensual sex, of course, are older than the oldest stand-up comedy routines: Citing any comedian as a pioneer in this territory only marks the time when it became socially unacceptable to tell them.  The article’s title evokes progress made in a movement to advance the rights of female comedians, and Zinoman praises Silverman’s success in proving that “there are areas of aggressive, shocking comedy where women could go further than men.”  However, his attempt to chronicle a new trend, in which violent humor is somehow being “reclaimed” by women, serves only to conflate equal access to rape jokes with progress for women, instead of recognizing it as a setback for everyone.  The way I understand it, there is simply a new class of rape-joke-apologists—including Silverman, Tina Fey, Whitney Cummings, Phoebe Robinson and Amy Schumer—that just happen to be women.

These routines reinforce destructive social norms that dismiss rape as an inevitable—even amusing—part of life, minimizing its harm and even attributing blame to victims.  As my colleague at the Alliance said, this article reads like a legitimization of rape jokes, as if the meaning of them is validated simply by their presence in the New York Times.

So, even though I applaud some of the above-named women for attempting to challenge gender stereotypes, I can’t say that I applaud their courage when it comes to rape jokes, because rape jokes aren’t “risky” for comedians: rape jokes are risky for all of us.

Laura Fidler
Research and Project Coordinator

As I observe the anniversary of September 11, Migraine
2001, I am appreciative of the many thoughtful tributes and reflections on the past 10 years written by members of the social justice community.  Of the lessons learned from that tragic day, I am deeply moved by those that embrace tolerance, empathy and compassion along with the pain.  I am reminded of the task of the anti sexual violence field to pursue social justice not only by helping victims to heal, but also by promoting inclusive, equitable practices in our workplaces and communities in order to challenge the harmful norms that allow sexual violence to occur.

In their articles for Colorlines.com, a publication of the Applied Research Center, Rinku Sen and Terry Kelleher consider the practices and values they believe will both help to rebuild a still-grieving nation, and make our communities safer from injustice and harm.  Rinku Sen writes,

“This is the lesson of 9/11 for me. I can’t call myself a person who values inclusion and compassion and then pick and choose those whom I accept. I can disagree, but I can’t disown. Not if I want to help build a nation that accepts rather than rejects; that constructs rather than destroys; that frees rather than enslaves. In such a nation, everyone needs to feel they belong, everyone reacts to the loss of that belonging, and everyone needs to feel its renewal when things change, as they always must. Every story has a sequel, shaped by our interpretation of the past. There is a 9/11 story in which we belong to each other. That’s the one I’ll be telling as we move into the next decade.” (Read the entire article: http://colorlines.com/archives/2011/09/my_september_11_story_we_belong_to_each_other.html)

In his reflection, Terry Kelleher shares a letter for his son, in which he encourages him to conduct an activity that we at the Alliance call visioning.  “Imagine what it could look like if we built our whole world around our best values,” Kelleher writes. “Every child could be healthy, safe and secure. Every family could have great schools, homes, health care and jobs. All neighborhoods could be friendly and fun. We could learn to work out our differences and practice peacemaking instead of rushing to war. We could treat each person and nation fairly.”  (Read the entire article: http://colorlines.com/archives/2011/09/a_letter_to_my_son_on_the_tenth_anniversary_of_september_11.html)

By taking the time to visualize the world we want to live in, where our work has been effective, we can better understand the steps needed to make it a reality.  We can ask ourselves the right questions to put ourselves on that path: What are our best values—those that protect everyone from harm? How can we put those into practice?

Laura Fidler
Research and Project Coordinator


Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 findings of the National Intimate Partner & Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).  These are the first findings of the CDC’s ongoing, ampoule nationally representative study of the scope and impact of intimate partner and sexual violence in the United States, implant as well as, visit web for the first time, a simultaneous study of prevalence at the state level.

It is also the first nationally representative study to collect lifetime and 12-month prevalence data on a broad range of sexually violent acts in addition to rape, including: sexual coercion; being forced to penetrate someone else; unwanted sexual contact and non-contact experiences; expressive psychological aggression and coercive control; and control of reproductive or sexual health.

The study shows that nearly 1 in 5 women have experienced rape (defined as any completed or attempted unwanted, forced penetration) in their lifetime–higher than previous national estimates–and finds that 44.6%, or nearly 1 in 2 women, have experienced lifetime sexual violence other than rape.  The study “affirmed that sexual violence against women remains endemic in the United States,” writes Rani Caryn Rabin of the The New York Times, and highlights the disproportionate burden experienced by women of color:  lifetime prevalence of rape for white women is estimated at 18.8%, 14.6% among Hispanic women, 22% among Black non-Hispanic women, 26.9% among American Indian and Alaskan Native women, and 33.5% among women who identify as multi-racial non-Hispanic.

The affect of sexual violence on other health outcomes is clear: the study shows that victims experience greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress, asthma, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and chronic pain.  Victims who experienced sexual violence at a young age were also at greater risk for subsequent victimization: more than one third of women who reported rape before the age of 18 also reported rape as an adult.

Find the CDC’s full report here, including estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence in New York state.
A November 15th article in the NY Times Arts section, psychotherapist
Female Comedians, medicine Breaking the Taste-Taboo Ceiling,” highlights supposed progress made in stand-up comedy, in which female comedians now tread a previously male-dominated line between cultural taboos and poor taste when it comes to laughing about rape.  Author Jason Zinoman credits comedian Sarah Silverman’s signature rape jokes as the vanguard, describing them as a “breakthrough for this new generation of female comedians.”

Jokes about nonconsensual sex, of course, are older than the oldest stand-up comedy routines: Citing any comedian as a pioneer in this territory only marks the time when it became socially unacceptable to tell them.  The article’s title evokes progress made in a movement to advance the rights of female comedians, and Zinoman praises Silverman’s success in proving that “there are areas of aggressive, shocking comedy where women could go further than men.”  However, his attempt to chronicle a new trend, in which violent humor is somehow being “reclaimed” by women, serves only to conflate equal access to rape jokes with progress for women, instead of recognizing it as a setback for everyone.  The way I understand it, there is simply a new class of rape-joke-apologists—including Silverman, Tina Fey, Whitney Cummings, Phoebe Robinson and Amy Schumer—that just happen to be women.

These routines reinforce destructive social norms that dismiss rape as an inevitable—even amusing—part of life, minimizing its harm and even attributing blame to victims.  As my colleague at the Alliance said, this article reads like a legitimization of rape jokes, as if the meaning of them is validated simply by their presence in the New York Times.

So, even though I applaud some of the above-named women for attempting to challenge gender stereotypes, I can’t say that I applaud their courage when it comes to rape jokes, because rape jokes aren’t “risky” for comedians: rape jokes are risky for all of us.

Laura Fidler
Research and Project Coordinator

As I observe the anniversary of September 11, Migraine
2001, I am appreciative of the many thoughtful tributes and reflections on the past 10 years written by members of the social justice community.  Of the lessons learned from that tragic day, I am deeply moved by those that embrace tolerance, empathy and compassion along with the pain.  I am reminded of the task of the anti sexual violence field to pursue social justice not only by helping victims to heal, but also by promoting inclusive, equitable practices in our workplaces and communities in order to challenge the harmful norms that allow sexual violence to occur.

In their articles for Colorlines.com, a publication of the Applied Research Center, Rinku Sen and Terry Kelleher consider the practices and values they believe will both help to rebuild a still-grieving nation, and make our communities safer from injustice and harm.  Rinku Sen writes,

“This is the lesson of 9/11 for me. I can’t call myself a person who values inclusion and compassion and then pick and choose those whom I accept. I can disagree, but I can’t disown. Not if I want to help build a nation that accepts rather than rejects; that constructs rather than destroys; that frees rather than enslaves. In such a nation, everyone needs to feel they belong, everyone reacts to the loss of that belonging, and everyone needs to feel its renewal when things change, as they always must. Every story has a sequel, shaped by our interpretation of the past. There is a 9/11 story in which we belong to each other. That’s the one I’ll be telling as we move into the next decade.” (Read the entire article: http://colorlines.com/archives/2011/09/my_september_11_story_we_belong_to_each_other.html)

In his reflection, Terry Kelleher shares a letter for his son, in which he encourages him to conduct an activity that we at the Alliance call visioning.  “Imagine what it could look like if we built our whole world around our best values,” Kelleher writes. “Every child could be healthy, safe and secure. Every family could have great schools, homes, health care and jobs. All neighborhoods could be friendly and fun. We could learn to work out our differences and practice peacemaking instead of rushing to war. We could treat each person and nation fairly.”  (Read the entire article: http://colorlines.com/archives/2011/09/a_letter_to_my_son_on_the_tenth_anniversary_of_september_11.html)

By taking the time to visualize the world we want to live in, where our work has been effective, we can better understand the steps needed to make it a reality.  We can ask ourselves the right questions to put ourselves on that path: What are our best values—those that protect everyone from harm? How can we put those into practice?

Laura Fidler
Research and Project Coordinator


When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, visit web
raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern

Mary Haviland’s Testimony to the Women’s Issues Committee of the New York City Council: Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act

February 27, erectile 2012

Good afternoon. My name is Mary Haviland. I am the Executive Director of the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

The Alliance is a city-wide clearing house and advocate for rape crisis centers in New York City; one of two Centers of Excellence in the state, sickness providing technical assistance and leadership on sexual assault prevention; one of 3 certified institutes in the state that provides training to medical personnel on forensic exams and evidence collection; and, more about finally, a motivator of research on cutting edge issues on intervention and the prevention of sexual assault.

I wish to applaud the members of Women’s Issues Committee of the New York City Council for holding a hearing to address an issue that is so crucial to survivors of Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).  This is perhaps the single most important piece of legislation for women and for victims of violence in the United States since first passing in 1994.

I want to give a picture of the problem.  We have the benefit of a recent, national, large scale and carefully executed survey that looked at Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence.  This survey, the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, which was conducted in 2010, found high levels of violence in the U.S. with 24 people being victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner every minute.[1] With regard to Sexual Assault, this survey found that 1 in 5 women or 18% and 1 in 71 or 1.4% of men have experienced attempted or completed rape in their lifetime. Women of color had significantly higher rates of rape and attempted rape with 22% of Black women and 27% of Native women experiencing rape sometime in their lifetimes.

Over the years VAWA has been expanded to provide multiple streams of funding to address domestic violence and sexual violence in as many ways. One of the greatest successes of VAWA is its emphasis on a coordinated community response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. These grants are administered by the National Office of Violence Against Women or OVW.  There are 3 legislated, restricted streams which go to each of the fifty states and then are administered by state agencies.  These are:

1. the S.T.O.P. grants that are divided between Services, Training, Officers and Prosecutors and more recently courts.  New York State received $7 million in STOP grant funding in FY11:69% of these funds are used for DV, 29% for Sexual Assault and 2% for stalking.

2. Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP) are funds that are solely dedicated to victims of sexual assault  but the amounts dedicated are much lower with NYS receiving $300,000 for FY 11. With approximately 65 rape crisis programs in the state, they each receive under $5,000.

3. State Coalitions funding that goes to DV and SA state-wide coalitions across the country.[2]

There are 18 distinct funding programs granted by the Office on Violence Against Women.  These grants provide resources to very important initiatives such as: enhancing culturally specific services; legal assistance to victims; grants address youth violence; funds for tribal communities and others.[3]

Under VAWA, there are provisions for immigrant victims of DV and SV that allows victim self-petition for Lawful Permanent Residency and an undocumented victim of either DV, SV or Trafficking who cooperates with the prosecution of crimes to receive temporary authorization to work through the U and T visas.[4]

VAWA initiated the primary prevention programs of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, directing funding to 14 states, including NYS, for DELTA Programs, and creating the Rape Program Education program.  RPE funds in NYS provide Rape Crisis Programs with approximately $50,000 each year to conduct educational and community mobilization programs.

This diverse, rich programming would not be possible without VAWA funding.  It touches diverse groups of survivors of violence, Rape Crisis Centers, DV programs, Law Enforcement and Prosecutors.

Provisions outlined in the current reauthorization of VAWA would improve services to victims of sexual assault in the following ways:

  • Apply the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), which works to detect, prevent, reduce, and punish instances of rape, to all immigration detention facilities under DHS and HHS;
  • Expand housing protections to victims of sexual assault that currently only apply to victims of domestic violence;
  • Require state to allocate at least 25% of their STOP grants to Sexual Assault; NYS currently allocates 29%.
  • Add dating violence and stalking to the list of crimes covered by the U Visa;
  • Allow the Department of Homeland Security to issue up to 5,000 additional visas to victims of domestic or sexual violence through the recapture of unused U visas; and
  • Clarify the definition of individuals who are eligible for VAWA protections and services to include LGBTQ individuals;
  • Allow for Tribal prosecution of DV and SA crimes that take place on tribal lands regardless of the whether the perpetrator is a member of the tribe or not. [5]

Some Republican Senators and a few conservative organizations object to the last three provisions.  The provisions pertaining to the LGBT and Native American communities are based on increased risk in these communities.  A report in 2010 by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs found that there is an increasing severity of violence against gays, lesbians and transgendered individuals and that access to services is very limited with more turned away from shelters than in 2009 and only about 50% of those who requested them received orders of protection. Native women are 2.5 times more likely than other U.S. women to be battered, raped, or stalked. (34% of Native women will be raped in their lifetimes and 39% will be the victim of domestic violence.)

Our activism on behalf of victims of violence has had measurable effects.  In the sexual assault advocacy community, VAWA has enabled:

  • Funding for intervention by Rape Crisis Centers;
  • Funding to prevent sexual assault. An example is the  collaboration the Alliance  had with Voces Latinas on a VAWA grant which equips community Promotoras who reach out to women working in bars and nightlife establishment to incorporate sexual violence education into to their HIV outreach work.
  • Improved response from Law Enforcement and Prosecution for sexual assault victims; and
  • Linkages between programs from the Multi-Disciplinary Task Forces in each of the 5 boroughs.

In the domestic violence advocacy community, we have seen non-fatal intimate partner violence decrease from 10 in 1000 women to 3.6  in 1000 between 1993 and 2005. We are on the right track, but much more needs to be done. Without VAWA, victims will suffer immeasurably.  Violence causes long-lasting health and psychological repercussions.  No one deserves to be a victim of violence and everyone deserves the opportunity that VAWA offers to heal from it.


[1] Black, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G., Walters, M.L., Merrick, M.T., Chen, J., & Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

[2] http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov/ovwgrantprograms.htm#1

[3] Ibid

[4]http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=ee1e3e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD&vgnextchannel=ee1e3e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD#U%20Nonimmigrant%20Eligibility

[5] http://www.ncdsv.org/images/LeahyCrapoProposeBillToReauthorizeLandmarkVAWA_11-30-2011.pdf

Mary Haviland’s Testimony to the Women’s Issues Committee of the New York City Council: Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act

February 27, pharmacist 2012

Good afternoon. My name is Mary Haviland. I am the Executive Director of the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

The Alliance is a city-wide clearing house and advocate for rape crisis centers in New York City; one of two Centers of Excellence in the state, providing technical assistance and leadership on sexual assault prevention; one of 3 certified institutes in the state that provides training to medical personnel on forensic exams and evidence collection; and, finally, a motivator of research on cutting edge issues on intervention and the prevention of sexual assault.

I wish to applaud the members of Women’s Issues Committee of the New York City Council for holding a hearing to address an issue that is so crucial to survivors of Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).  This is perhaps the single most important piece of legislation for women and for victims of violence in the United States since first passing in 1994.

I want to give a picture of the problem.  We have the benefit of a recent, national, large scale and carefully executed survey that looked at Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence.  This survey, the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, which was conducted in 2010, found high levels of violence in the U.S. with 24 people being victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner every minute.[1] With regard to Sexual Assault, this survey found that 1 in 5 women or 18% and 1 in 71 or 1.4% of men have experienced attempted or completed rape in their lifetime. Women of color had significantly higher rates of rape and attempted rape with 22% of Black women and 27% of Native women experiencing rape sometime in their lifetimes.

Over the years VAWA has been expanded to provide multiple streams of funding to address domestic violence and sexual violence in as many ways. One of the greatest successes of VAWA is its emphasis on a coordinated community response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. These grants are administered by the National Office of Violence Against Women or OVW.  There are 3 legislated, restricted streams which go to each of the fifty states and then are administered by state agencies.  These are:

1. the S.T.O.P. grants that are divided between Services, Training, Officers and Prosecutors and more recently courts.  New York State received $7 million in STOP grant funding in FY11:69% of these funds are used for DV, 29% for Sexual Assault and 2% for stalking.

2. Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP) are funds that are solely dedicated to victims of sexual assault  but the amounts dedicated are much lower with NYS receiving $300,000 for FY 11. With approximately 65 rape crisis programs in the state, they each receive under $5,000.

3. State Coalitions funding that goes to DV and SA state-wide coalitions across the country.[2]

There are 18 distinct funding programs granted by the Office on Violence Against Women.  These grants provide resources to very important initiatives such as: enhancing culturally specific services; legal assistance to victims; grants address youth violence; funds for tribal communities and others.[3]

Under VAWA, there are provisions for immigrant victims of DV and SV that allows victim self-petition for Lawful Permanent Residency and an undocumented victim of either DV, SV or Trafficking who cooperates with the prosecution of crimes to receive temporary authorization to work through the U and T visas.[4]

VAWA initiated the primary prevention programs of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, directing funding to 14 states, including NYS, for DELTA Programs, and creating the Rape Program Education program.  RPE funds in NYS provide Rape Crisis Programs with approximately $50,000 each year to conduct educational and community mobilization programs.

This diverse, rich programming would not be possible without VAWA funding.  It touches diverse groups of survivors of violence, Rape Crisis Centers, DV programs, Law Enforcement and Prosecutors.

Provisions outlined in the current reauthorization of VAWA would improve services to victims of sexual assault in the following ways:

  • Apply the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), which works to detect, prevent, reduce, and punish instances of rape, to all immigration detention facilities under DHS and HHS;
  • Expand housing protections to victims of sexual assault that currently only apply to victims of domestic violence;
  • Require state to allocate at least 25% of their STOP grants to Sexual Assault; NYS currently allocates 29%.
  • Add dating violence and stalking to the list of crimes covered by the U Visa;
  • Allow the Department of Homeland Security to issue up to 5,000 additional visas to victims of domestic or sexual violence through the recapture of unused U visas; and
  • Clarify the definition of individuals who are eligible for VAWA protections and services to include LGBTQ individuals;
  • Allow for Tribal prosecution of DV and SA crimes that take place on tribal lands regardless of the whether the perpetrator is a member of the tribe or not. [5]

Some Republican Senators and a few conservative organizations object to the last three provisions.  The provisions pertaining to the LGBT and Native American communities are based on increased risk in these communities.  A report in 2010 by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs found that there is an increasing severity of violence against gays, lesbians and transgendered individuals and that access to services is very limited with more turned away from shelters than in 2009 and only about 50% of those who requested them received orders of protection. Native women are 2.5 times more likely than other U.S. women to be battered, raped, or stalked. (34% of Native women will be raped in their lifetimes and 39% will be the victim of domestic violence.)

Our activism on behalf of victims of violence has had measurable effects.  In the sexual assault advocacy community, VAWA has enabled:

  • Funding for intervention by Rape Crisis Centers;
  • Funding to prevent sexual assault. An example is the  collaboration the Alliance  had with Voces Latinas on a VAWA grant which equips community Promotoras who reach out to women working in bars and nightlife establishment to incorporate sexual violence education into to their HIV outreach work.
  • Improved response from Law Enforcement and Prosecution for sexual assault victims; and
  • Linkages between programs from the Multi-Disciplinary Task Forces in each of the 5 boroughs.

In the domestic violence advocacy community, we have seen non-fatal intimate partner violence decrease from 10 in 1000 women to 3.6  in 1000 between 1993 and 2005. We are on the right track, but much more needs to be done. Without VAWA, victims will suffer immeasurably.  Violence causes long-lasting health and psychological repercussions.  No one deserves to be a victim of violence and everyone deserves the opportunity that VAWA offers to heal from it.


[1] Black, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G., Walters, M.L., Merrick, M.T., Chen, J., & Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

[2] http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov/ovwgrantprograms.htm#1

[3] Ibid

[4]http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=ee1e3e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD&vgnextchannel=ee1e3e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD#U%20Nonimmigrant%20Eligibility

[5] http://www.ncdsv.org/images/LeahyCrapoProposeBillToReauthorizeLandmarkVAWA_11-30-2011.pdf

Mary Haviland’s Testimony to the Women’s Issues Committee of the New York City Council: Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act

February 27, decease 2012

Good afternoon. My name is Mary Haviland. I am the Executive Director of the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

The Alliance is a city-wide clearing house and advocate for rape crisis centers in New York City; one of two Centers of Excellence in the state, approved providing technical assistance and leadership on sexual assault prevention; one of 3 certified institutes in the state that provides training to medical personnel on forensic exams and evidence collection; and, finally, a motivator of research on cutting edge issues on intervention and the prevention of sexual assault.

I wish to applaud the members of Women’s Issues Committee of the New York City Council for holding a hearing to address an issue that is so crucial to survivors of Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).  This is perhaps the single most important piece of legislation for women and for victims of violence in the United States since first passing in 1994.

I want to give a picture of the problem.  We have the benefit of a recent, national, large scale and carefully executed survey that looked at Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence.  This survey, the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, which was conducted in 2010, found high levels of violence in the U.S. with 24 people being victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner every minute.[1] With regard to Sexual Assault, this survey found that 1 in 5 women or 18% and 1 in 71 or 1.4% of men have experienced attempted or completed rape in their lifetime. Women of color had significantly higher rates of rape and attempted rape with 22% of Black women and 27% of Native women experiencing rape sometime in their lifetimes.

Over the years VAWA has been expanded to provide multiple streams of funding to address domestic violence and sexual violence in as many ways. One of the greatest successes of VAWA is its emphasis on a coordinated community response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. These grants are administered by the National Office of Violence Against Women or OVW.  There are 3 legislated, restricted streams which go to each of the fifty states and then are administered by state agencies.  These are:

1. the S.T.O.P. grants that are divided between Services, Training, Officers and Prosecutors and more recently courts.  New York State received $7 million in STOP grant funding in FY11:69% of these funds are used for DV, 29% for Sexual Assault and 2% for stalking.

2. Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP) are funds that are solely dedicated to victims of sexual assault  but the amounts dedicated are much lower with NYS receiving $300,000 for FY 11. With approximately 65 rape crisis programs in the state, they each receive under $5,000.

3. State Coalitions funding that goes to DV and SA state-wide coalitions across the country.[2]

There are 18 distinct funding programs granted by the Office on Violence Against Women.  These grants provide resources to very important initiatives such as: enhancing culturally specific services; legal assistance to victims; grants address youth violence; funds for tribal communities and others.[3]

Under VAWA, there are provisions for immigrant victims of DV and SV that allows victim self-petition for Lawful Permanent Residency and an undocumented victim of either DV, SV or Trafficking who cooperates with the prosecution of crimes to receive temporary authorization to work through the U and T visas.[4]

VAWA initiated the primary prevention programs of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, directing funding to 14 states, including NYS, for DELTA Programs, and creating the Rape Program Education program.  RPE funds in NYS provide Rape Crisis Programs with approximately $50,000 each year to conduct educational and community mobilization programs.

This diverse, rich programming would not be possible without VAWA funding.  It touches diverse groups of survivors of violence, Rape Crisis Centers, DV programs, Law Enforcement and Prosecutors.

Provisions outlined in the current reauthorization of VAWA would improve services to victims of sexual assault in the following ways:

  • Apply the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), which works to detect, prevent, reduce, and punish instances of rape, to all immigration detention facilities under DHS and HHS;
  • Expand housing protections to victims of sexual assault that currently only apply to victims of domestic violence;
  • Require state to allocate at least 25% of their STOP grants to Sexual Assault; NYS currently allocates 29%.
  • Add dating violence and stalking to the list of crimes covered by the U Visa;
  • Allow the Department of Homeland Security to issue up to 5,000 additional visas to victims of domestic or sexual violence through the recapture of unused U visas; and
  • Clarify the definition of individuals who are eligible for VAWA protections and services to include LGBTQ individuals;
  • Allow for Tribal prosecution of DV and SA crimes that take place on tribal lands regardless of the whether the perpetrator is a member of the tribe or not. [5]

Some Republican Senators and a few conservative organizations object to the last three provisions.  The provisions pertaining to the LGBT and Native American communities are based on increased risk in these communities.  A report in 2010 by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs found that there is an increasing severity of violence against gays, lesbians and transgendered individuals and that access to services is very limited with more turned away from shelters than in 2009 and only about 50% of those who requested them received orders of protection. Native women are 2.5 times more likely than other U.S. women to be battered, raped, or stalked. (34% of Native women will be raped in their lifetimes and 39% will be the victim of domestic violence.)

Our activism on behalf of victims of violence has had measurable effects.  In the sexual assault advocacy community, VAWA has enabled:

  • Funding for intervention by Rape Crisis Centers;
  • Funding to prevent sexual assault. An example is the  collaboration the Alliance  had with Voces Latinas on a VAWA grant which equips community Promotoras who reach out to women working in bars and nightlife establishment to incorporate sexual violence education into to their HIV outreach work.
  • Improved response from Law Enforcement and Prosecution for sexual assault victims; and
  • Linkages between programs from the Multi-Disciplinary Task Forces in each of the 5 boroughs.

In the domestic violence advocacy community, we have seen non-fatal intimate partner violence decrease from 10 in 1000 women to 3.6  in 1000 between 1993 and 2005. We are on the right track, but much more needs to be done. Without VAWA, victims will suffer immeasurably.  Violence causes long-lasting health and psychological repercussions.  No one deserves to be a victim of violence and everyone deserves the opportunity that VAWA offers to heal from it.


[1] Black, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G., Walters, M.L., Merrick, M.T., Chen, J., & Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

[2] http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov/ovwgrantprograms.htm#1

[3] Ibid

[4]http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=ee1e3e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD&vgnextchannel=ee1e3e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD#U%20Nonimmigrant%20Eligibility

[5] http://www.ncdsv.org/images/LeahyCrapoProposeBillToReauthorizeLandmarkVAWA_11-30-2011.pdf

[TRIGGER WARNING:  Please read carefully, there share responsibly and seek support when needed]

On March 12, hemophilia London-based blogger, London Feminist, explored the scope of silence–and silencing–experienced by survivors of sexual harassment by creating the Twitter hashtag #ididnotreport. She writes, “I had no idea how powerful that would be.  I had imagined that it was predominantly low-level street harassment which was not reported…Far more serious attacks go unreported.”

In little more than a week, thousands of tweets and retweets from around the world have included #ididnotreport, using just 140 characters to share the personal, and often painful barriers to reporting sexual assault, with many disclosing experiences of rape, incest and child sexual abuse — some doing so for the first time.

User @ohmymaggs writes, “#IDidNotReport it when I was a child to protect my family, whom I loved and didn’t want to hurt. Wish he’d felt the same.”

Another tweet, by @AnonymousLark, reads, ” I was just a kid, ashamed & afraid. I got out of the situation, w/minor trauma. But I wonder how many girls I let down cause #ididnotreport”.

These tweets illustrate the toxic effect of the harmful social norms that discourage victims from coming forward, but they also highlight opportunities for health promotion through social media and other alternative, safe spaces for victims to break their silence and be received with validation.  Our NYC friends and allies at Hollaback! note that online anti-violence activism such as #ididnotreport (and, I might add, all the amazing contributors to iHollaback.org) can “provide survivors of sexual abuse and victims of sexual harassment a mountain to shout their stories from.”  A mountain.  I love it.

Indeed, many supporters are using the #ididnotreport hashtag as a way to commend and validate victims for their courage: User @meghsaid writes, “Reading #ididnotreport is making me cry in public.  You’re all strong beautiful creatures, it was not your fault #webelieveyou”. As my colleague Jes wisely pointed out, the space is also needed to “remind people that the choice they made was ok,” and it seems many followers of #ididnotreport similarly recognize that many victims still experience challenges to reporting despite the creation of this “spontaneous support group.”

Musician and activist (and one of this writer’s personal heroes) Billy Bragg tweeted, “Anyone who believes that equality has been achieved and feminism no longer matters should listen to the women at #ididnotreport.”  His message points to the urgency of #ididnotreport: Not only do we live in a culture where individuals endure sexual violence, but we live in a culture that revictimizes those who seek justice.  London Feminist notes, “It made me wonder: what would happen if, just for a month, or even a week, every woman who is intimidated or threatened or groped or grabbed or fondled or frightened by street harassment actually did report it?  I imagine the criminal justice system would collapse.  And would it remedy or intensify the culture of disbelief?”

Alexis Marbach of the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault shares her hope that the space for storytelling created by #ididnotreport generates a greater conversation about the need for “a climate where survivors feel supported, valued, and heard.”  Alexis identifies the opportunity for prevention here as well: a culture that lovingly and unconditionally supports survivors who come forward is a culture where people can live freer from sexual violence.

Action Alert: Gather to support Nafissatou Diallo & all victims of sexual assault

August 18, 2011, 11:01 am — admin (Uncategorized)

We’re so excited to bring you this video, web cialis 40mg produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

<iframe width=”425″ height=”349″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/xNBHwVIZ3VQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

We’re so excited to bring you this video, more about produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, ask the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, troche they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

<iframe width=”425″ height=”349″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/xNBHwVIZ3VQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>
We’re so excited to bring you this video, weight loss produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

<iframe width=”425″ height=”349″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/xNBHwVIZ3VQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>
We’re so excited to bring you this video, pharmacy produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

TORCH Denim Day
We’re so excited to bring you this video, disinfection produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

TORCH Denim Day
We’re so excited to bring you this video, buy produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, tadalafil the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, Hemorrhoids
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, store the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, pharm
both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, Hemorrhoids
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, store the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, pharm
both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, adiposity
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, here
the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, Hemorrhoids
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, store the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, pharm
both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, adiposity
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, here
the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, food
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, one Health
the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, stuff both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, Hemorrhoids
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, store the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, pharm
both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, adiposity
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, here
the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, food
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, one Health
the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, stuff both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998

The Alliance is co-sponsoring two public events planned around the August 23rd court hearing in the Dominque Strauss-Kahn sexual assault case.  We hope you will join us at both events to stand in solidarity with Nafissatou Diallo and all victims of sexual assault.

AUGUST 22, pulmonologist
2011

The Alliance is proud to co-sponsor a Press Conference with NYC Council Member Letitia James and other women’s advocacy organizations in support of Nafissatou Diallo

WHAT

Press Conference

WHEN

Monday, August 22 from 5 pm – 7 pm

WHERE

City Hall steps

With regard to the DSK case, the organizers and supporters have set the following goals:

  • Urge the Manhattan DA to look at the facts of the case, as well as the Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s history of conduct.
  • Cease leaking of information pertaining to the case.
  • Take into STRONG consideration Ms. Diallo’s medical report which includes testimony consistent with what the accuser told police, and which lists the cause of injuries as “rape”.

______________________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 23, 2011

Join the Connect the Dots Coalition and RALLY in support of Nafissatou Diallo

WHAT

Rally

WHEN

Tuesday, August 23, 2011 at 11:00 a.m.

WHERE

100 Centre Street

(We will line the front of the Criminal Courthouse holding signs and banners.)

RAISE YOUR VOICES to demand a continuance of the Manhattan criminal case against Dominque Straus-Kahn

Former International Monetary Fund chief Dominque Straus-Kahn was arrested and charged with the May 14, 2011 sexual assault of Ms. Diallo, a housekeeper at the Sofitel hotel. Ms. Diallo’s medical report is consistent with her account of the attack, and the NYC hospital that treated her lists the cause of her injuries as “assault” and “rape.”

A court hearing before Judge Michael Obus is set for late morning on August 23rd at the Criminal Courthouse at 100 Centre Street. Media reports from anonymous sources indicate the case may be dropped because of “credibility issues.” Make sure you are present to show your solidarity with Ms. Diallo and all sexual assault victims, and to protest the barbaric practice of victim-blaming.

Ms. Diallo deserves her day in court!

Connect the Dots is a coalition comprised of CONNECT, Crime Victims Treatment Center, Feministing, National Organization for Women (NOW-NYC), The Healing Center, New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault and Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN).

Reflections on the DSK & Nafissatou Diallo case: What we know about sexual assault & victim-blaming

August 1, 2011, 11:16 am — admin (Uncategorized)

We’re so excited to bring you this video, web cialis 40mg produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

<iframe width=”425″ height=”349″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/xNBHwVIZ3VQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

We’re so excited to bring you this video, more about produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, ask the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, troche they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

<iframe width=”425″ height=”349″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/xNBHwVIZ3VQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>
We’re so excited to bring you this video, weight loss produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

<iframe width=”425″ height=”349″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/xNBHwVIZ3VQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>
We’re so excited to bring you this video, pharmacy produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

TORCH Denim Day
We’re so excited to bring you this video, disinfection produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

TORCH Denim Day
We’re so excited to bring you this video, buy produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, tadalafil the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
We’re so excited to bring you this video, store produced by student participants in the National Institute for Reproductive Health/NARAL Pro-Choice NY’s TORCH Program.

According to the Director of the program, the ” teens really wanted to make a video raising awareness about sexual violence.  They used the stats provided by the Denim Day website to help educate their peers about this important issue.  This video was completely created by the teens, they are very proud of the product.  They are finalizing a poster/flyer to be put up around their schools with the same stats and a link to the video.”

And without further ado, the video!

Here at the Alliance, recuperation
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, buy summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned

Here at the Alliance, order
summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, discount RX
an organization that is part of ARISE, try to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

Here at the Alliance, troche
doctor summer time means new interns!  We are excited to be joined by two amazing women who will be blogging throughout the summer.  Keep reading to learn more about them:

My name is Anastasia Ramirez and I am the Research and Project intern here at the Alliance.  This summer I’m working on reconnecting the Action Research for Immigrant Social Empowerment (ARISE) coalition to continue steps for a PAR study on immigrant women’s experience when seeking help for sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV).  I am also working with Voces Latinas, an organization that is part of ARISE, to help their community outreach leaders present to justice personnel and law enforcement on being sensitive and culturally appropriate when helping Latinas seeking help for SV/DV.  You can learn more about the Alliance’s work with the ARISE coalition here.

My name is Caitlin Monahan and this summer I am going to be working as a Development and Communications Intern at the NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault.  I will be working closely with Cathleen Cogswell, our Development and Communications Director, to search for grant opportunities for the Alliance as well as coordinate outreach between our organization and other similar organizations to strengthen our network of allies in the fight against sexual violence.  I am extremely excited to work with the Alliance this summer and to do my part to further our vision of a city free from sexual violence!

Stay tuned for their posts…

In early June, surgeon
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, buy information pills
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, health the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, anaemia
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams but we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts.
In early June, stomach
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, allergy
including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
In early June, this web
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin                                                                                                                     Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, treatment raise awareness, prosthetic
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, cost
generic raise awareness, etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, prosthesis
raise awareness, hospital
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, order you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, medicine
raise awareness, otolaryngologist
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their Stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
When I was part of the Youth Action Council here at the Alliance during high school I participated in an event called SAY SO! (Sexual Assault Yearly Speak Out).  This event helped me realize how important and empowering it is to share stories about sexual violence (SV) and domestic violence (DV) whether it is a way for one to heal, drugs
raise awareness, approved
etc.  As I learn more about women’s experiences with SV/DV I am noticing that there is not always a safe place for women to share their stories or to hear from other survivors.

I just came upon a project entitled “Women Speak: Women Tell Their stories of Discrimination” which is a site via tumblr for women from Trinidad and Tobago and the Carribean Region to have their voices heard about experiences with discrimination—some of these stories are about experiences with SV/DV.  Check out the link below to view women’s stories and other relevant information.  If interested, web
you can share your story (with the option of remaining anonymous).

Here’s the link! Click on Women’s Stories.

Why is it important to share stories?

“The WomenSpeak Project believes that this sharing of experiences will arouse a collective consciousness that will result in the following:

1. Introspection; a way for women to verbalize and ‘make sense’ of the incidents that have happened to them.

2. Allow women to develop a greater awareness about how the choices and decisions they make may be influenced by these pervasive forms of discrimination.

3. Help women develop a greater sense of empathy and community of support for other women who face discrimination.

4. Give men a bird’s eye view of some of the challenges women face and how their actions may affect women. [Raise awareness]

5. Provide the impetus for women (and men) to create their own movement and advocate for these issues whether it be on a personal, group, or national basis. [Invoke social change]”

A participant in the Alliance’s 2008 study on violence against immigrant women commented on the value of sharing her story: “It [speaking about the violence] helps to break the isolation I feel.”  Read Bringing the Global to the Local: Using Participatory Research to Address Sexual Violence with Immigrant Communities in NYC (pdf).

Also if you’re curious about SAY SO!, or want to coordinate a SAY SO! event in your community, please visit the full announcement on the Alliance website.

Anastasia

Research and Projects Intern
In early June, stuff Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proposed a budget for the coming fiscal year that would cut $1.27 million from programs intended to help sexual assault victims, including the Sexual Assault Response Teams. These highly trained teams are crucial to properly collecting the evidence that can later be used to prosecute perpetrators and prevent them from committing further acts of sexual violence. Without these teams in place, the impact on victims will be devastating. In the past, many emergency room doctors were not properly trained in collecting rape kits, causing victims unnecessary grief in an already overwhelming situation. In a New York Times article by John Eligon, Karen Carroll recalled her experience before SART where the doctor performing her rape kit had to read the instructions on the box during the exam. SART are specially trained to collect the necessary evidence to prosecute while maintaining a level of compassion for the victim and keeping them comfortable. To take away from this program now would be a grave injustice when we have already come so far.

Caitlin

Development and Communications Intern

UPDATE:  Late Friday night, funding for SART was officially reinstated in the FY12 City budget!! This is a major win for the anti-sexual violence movement and more importantly, for all New Yorkers! As advocates, we are excited that city officials finally acknowledged the tremendous value of Sexual Assault Response Teams and we will continue to expect anti-sexual violence programming to be safe from budget cuts in future years.
The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault applauds the courageous victims of sexual assault who come forward to report the crime. Victim-blaming is a common defense tactic, Hemorrhoids
and the risk is greater when the case involves a famous or powerful person: This has been the experience of Nafissatou Diallo, store the Sofitel housekeeper who has accused former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in his hotel room last May.

In this highly polarizing case, pharm
both Mr. Strauss-Kahn and Ms. Diallo have been tried and “convicted,” in a sense, by the international press. While the outcome of this high-profile case is in limbo, and we may never know the full details of what happened behind closed doors, here is what we do know about sexual assaults:

We know that victim blaming is practiced widely in our culture. While celebrity rape cases grab the headlines, many sexual violence crimes treat the victim as “suspect” because he/she dressed provocatively, drank alcohol or used drugs, engaged in some form of consensual sex prior to the attack, or did not put up a struggle. Defense attorneys routinely attack the credibility of a sexual assault victim by digging up any incriminating details from his/her past. This practice has a chilling effect on survivors. Victims of sexual violence are deeply ashamed, humiliated and fearful of scrutiny of their private life.  Many are afraid to report the crime for fear of being “put on trial.”

We know immigrant women are more vulnerable and at greater risk for victimization and exploitation by individuals in a position of power or authority, due to factors such immigration status, isolation, cultural and language barriers, as well as fear of, and uncertainty of seeking help from the police.

We know sexual assaults are crimes of violence and power, not of passion. The attacker’s motivation is to humiliate, debase and control the victim. Perpetrators often select victims whom they perceive as vulnerable or whom they have power over. In a workplace setting, the victim may not report the crime for fear of retaliation, fear of being blamed for the attack or fear losing her/his job.

We know there is no “normal way” to react to a sexual assault. Reactions vary significantly, and run the gamut from anger, withdrawal, hysteria, numbness and apathy. Some victims cope by resuming normal activities, such as going back to work, shopping, or even returning to the setting where they met their assailant.

We know false accusations are extremely rare. Victims of trauma commonly experience shock, numbing, and dissociation as well as effects on memory of details. As a result, it is not uncommon for a victim’s statement to contain inconsistencies and/or untrue statements. This, however, should not be confused with a false allegation. According to a study by the American Prosecutors Research Institute, false rape allegations account for 2 – 8% of all reported rapes.[1]

We know sexual assault is a public health crisis in the United States. One in six American women– and one in 33 men – has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.[2] Until we accept the prevalence, nature and scope of sexual violence, and stop placing blame on victims, sexual assault will remain the most underreported crime in the nation.


[1] Lonsway, Kimberly A., Joanne Archambault, and David Lisak. 2009 False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The Voice 3(1):1-11

[2] National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998

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Blog posts are the responsibility of their authors, and do not reflect the opinions of the New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

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