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SEEKING SUPPORT?
The Alliance has compiled a number of resources available for survivors, their friends and families, and professionals assisting survivors in New York City.

FAQ and Factsheets: Interpersonal Violence

Acquaintance Rape

When most people think of rape, they visualize an unknown lunatic violently dragging a defenseless person into a dark alley. This is a very inaccurate portrayal. Almost four out of five rapes are committed by attackers who knew or recognized their victims. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Campus Crime Victims

Victims of campus violence, like all victims of crime, react to their victimizations in many different ways. Immediately after the crime, victims often struggle with feelings of fear, helplessness, confusion, guilt, self-blame, shock, disbelief, denial, anger, shame and numerous other emotions. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Community Action

Crisis and tragedy often ignite a sense of outrage, sorrow and concern which can unite citizens with one another in support of a common cause. When a member of a community becomes a victim of physical or emotional harm, it may serve as a painful reminder that no individual is immune to such tragedy. A highly publicized violent crime often precipitates a desire for community members to take extra measures to protect themselves and their families. During these times of individual, familial, and community suffering, the movement of community activism for victims' rights is often launched. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Crime Prevention

Although crime and victimization rates have steadily declined since the early 1990's, society's perception and fear of crime is still very high. Greater participation between community members and local law enforcement is needed to help ensure that crime and victimization rates continue to decline. Crime prevention is a concept that can help reduce crime and public fear and perception of crime. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Dating Violence Information for Teens

Dating violence is controlling, abusive and aggressive behavior in a romantic relationship. It can happen in straight or gay relationships. It can include verbal, emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, or a combination of them. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Domestic Violence

The average yearly loss to female victims of intimate violence in medical expenses is $61,000,000; when broken or stolen property and lost pay is added to the figure it increases to $150,000,000 (Greenfield et al, 1998); when indirect costs are included, such as pain and suffering and loss of quality of life, another $65,000,000 annually would need to added (Miller, et al, 1996). Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Domestic Violence and the Law

Domestic violence has traditionally been defined as violence in the home, or between family members. As society's definition of family has changed, so has the law's definition of family violence. While some states cling to the traditional view of domestic violence as between spouses or former spouses, increasingly legislatures are expanding the scope of the law to include children, relatives, unmarried persons living together, persons with a child in common, and even those in an "intimate relationship." Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Legislative Topics

Extensions of the Criminal & Civil Statutes of Limitations in Child Sexual Abuse Cases

Most states have laws limiting the time during which crimes other than murder may be prosecuted. All states have time limitations for bringing a lawsuit to recover money for damages from the wrongdoing of another -- a civil action. In recent years, many states have adopted extensions to their criminal and civil statutes of limitation for cases of child sexual abuse and in certain other sexual assault cases. The length of the extension varies greatly between the states. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Legislative Topics

How to Help a Friend

Sometimes it’s hard to know what to do or say if a friend has been a victim of crime. Understand that your friend is probably dealing with many different emotions and might not know how to talk about it either. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Information for Parents of Teens

Teens are very vulnerable to crime and unfortunately become victims of crime more than any other age group. They experience all the same crimes that adults do—from robbery, sexual assault, and car theft, to relationship violence, assaults and bullying. How you— and other adults—respond can make a big difference in how your child copes with and recovers from the event. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

PTSD and Relationships

Those who develop PTSD may experience lasting problems in their intimate and family relationships or close friendships. PTSD involves symptoms that interfere with trust, emotional closeness, communication, responsible assertiveness, and effective problem solving. In seeking treatment, is it best to find a professional with expertise in both PTSD and in treating couples or families. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD and the Family

Traumatic experiences that happen to one member of a family can affect everyone else in the family. When trauma reactions are severe and go on for some time without treatment, they can cause major problems in a family. This fact sheet will describe family members' reactions to the traumatic event and to the survivor's symptoms and behaviors. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Rule For Nonimmigrant Victims Of Human Trafficking And Specified

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has transmitted an interim final rule to the Federal Register that will allow “T” and “U” nonimmigrants to adjust status their status and become lawful permanent residents.

The “T” nonimmigrant status, also known as the “T” visa, was created to provide immigration protection to victims of a severe form of human trafficking. The “U” nonimmigrant status, or “U” visa, is designated for victims of certain crimes who have suffered mental or physical abuse because of the crime and who are willing to assist law enforcement and government officials in the investigation of the criminal activity.

Read More...

From the Series: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

Sexual Assault

In 1992, the National Women’s Study estimated that 683,000 adult American women are forcibly raped each year (National Center for Victims of Crime & Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, 1992). According to Bureau of Justice Statistics data, U.S. male and female residents age 12 and older experienced an estimated 307,000 rapes and sexual assaults in 1996 (Ringel, 1997). The difference between the number of rapes in 1992 and the number of rapes and sexual assaults in 1996 reflects standard statistical error and differences in methodology. One significant methodological difference is that the National Women’s Study interviewed individuals by telephone, allowing women greater confidence in their anonymity. The Bureau of Justice Statistics conducted face-to-face interviews, in some cases with entire families present, which could have possibly deterred disclosure. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Sexual Assault against Females

Focusing specifically on adult female victims of sexual assault, this fact sheet defines sexual assault, discusses rates of frequency, and provides an overview of some of the short-term and long-term concerns for female victims. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Sexual Assault Information for Teens

For sexual activity to be okay, it must be consensual-which means that both people want it to happen. Sexual assault is when any person forces you to participate in a sexual act when you don't want to. This can include touching or penetrating the vagina, mouth or anus of the victim (often called rape), touching the penis of the victim, or forcing the victim to touch the attacker's vagina, penis, or anus. Touching can mean with a hand, finger, mouth, penis, or just about anything else, including objects. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Sexual Assault Legislation

Sexual assault is a general term which can include many different crimes and varying degrees of severity of those offenses, such as: rape in the first degree, second degree sexual contact, sexual conduct, and indecent exposure, to name a few. Sexual assault almost always involves sexual intercourse oral or anal intercourse or the penetration or touching of the genitals or anal orifice with a part of the body or an inanimate object. It can be committed by one or more persons against another who is unwilling or unable to physically, mentally or legally consent to the sexual act. In recent years, many states have amended their laws concerning sexual assault to make such crimes gender-neutral that is, sexual assault can be by a male against a female, male against male, female against male, or female against female. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Legislative Topics

Stalking

Stalking is a pattern of repeated, unwanted attention, harassment, and contact. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Stalking

Teen Dating Violence

Teen dating violence is abusive and violent behavior in teen dating relationships. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Teen Dating Violence

This information packet has been developed by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) as an introduction to the dynamics, prevalence and consequences of teen dating violence. The packet explores issues specific to teen dating violence, examines current provision of support services for teens and presents information about a variety of promising prevention and intervention strategies. While some awareness materials such as booklets, checklists and posters are included, the intent of packet contents is to examine some of the key dating violence issues currently facing teens and their advocates. Read More...

From the Series: National Resource Center on Domestic Violence

Victim Impact Statements

The term "victim impact statement" refers to written or oral information about the impact of the crime on the victim and the victim's family. Victim impact statements are most commonly used at sentencing. Such statements provide a means for the court to refocus its attention, at least momentarily, on the human cost of the crime. They also provide a way for the victim to participate in the criminal justice process. The right to make an impact statement generally is extended beyond the direct victim to homicide survivors, the parent or guardian of a minor victim, and the guardian or representative of an incompetent or incapacitated victim. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Legislative Topics

Rape as a Men's Issue

An educational handout describing the prevelance of sexual victimization for males, some consequences for male survivors, and the role men can play in ending sexual violence. Read More...

From the Series: Men Can Stop Rape
Related Links

Resource Guide
Guide to Survivor Services
[Go to the Service Map]


The Resource Guide is a free information service from The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

If you know of a resource for sexual assault survivors which should be included in the Guide, please tell us about it.


Manhattan Borough President Stringer with Denim Day supporters
Manhattan Borough President Stringer with Denim Day supporters