»
»
»
»
SEEKING SUPPORT?
The Alliance has compiled a number of resources available for survivors, their friends and families, and professionals assisting survivors in New York City.

FAQ and Factsheets: Trauma

Anger and Trauma

Anger is usually a central feature of a survivor's response to trauma because it is a core component of the survival response in humans. Anger helps people cope with life's adversities by providing us with increased energy to persist in the face of obstacles. However, uncontrolled anger can lead to a continued sense of being out of control of oneself and can create multiple problems in the personal lives of those who suffer from PTSD. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Child Sexual Abuse

Twenty-nine percent of female rape victims in America were younger than eleven when they were raped (National Center for Victims of Crime & Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, 1992). Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Complex PTSD

The diagnosis of PTSD accurately describes the symptoms that result when a person experiences a short-lived trauma. For example, car accidents, natural disasters, and rape are considered traumatic events of time-limited duration. However, chronic traumas continue for months or years at a time. Clinicians and researchers have found that the current PTSD diagnosis often does not capture the severe psychological harm that occurs with such prolonged, repeated trauma. For example, ordinary, healthy people who experience chronic trauma can experience changes in their self-concept and the way they adapt to stressful events. Dr. Judith Herman of Harvard University suggests that a new diagnosis, called Complex PTSD, is needed to describe the symptoms of long-term trauma. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Crime Victims & Corrections

In 1982, the Final Report of the President’s Task Force on Victims of Crime included four key recommendations to improve victim services in the parole process. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Crime Victims Rights in the News Media

The news media can often inflict a "second victimization" upon crime victims or survivors by enhancing their feelings of violation, disorientation, and loss of control. It is important for journalists to understand the emotions felt by victims and survivors, who are often disoriented and confused following a crime. Victims should have the rights when dealing with media that include refusing interviews, limiting the scope of questions, demanding corrections, and the right to anonymity. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Discussing Trauma and PTSD with Your Doctor

The experiencing or witnessing of traumatic events can lead to psychological (emotional) problems and to physical problems (in addition to any that occurred at the time of the trauma). These symptoms can last for a relatively short time after the event, can last for months or years, or can "surface" months or even years later. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Forensic Validity of a PTSD Diagnosis

Many types of civil and criminal court cases and litigation involve claims of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. The diagnostic validity of these claims can impact directly upon the defense, plaintiff, or prosecutorial strategy, depending upon the nature of the case. It is important, therefore, for attorneys and others involved in the legal system to be able to assess the validity of PTSD evaluations and diagnoses. Although only an expert in PTSD can complete an in-depth review of a case and the diagnostic methodology, it is helpful if those conducting initial reviews know some basic facts about PTSD and what constitutes a sound diagnosis. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

How to Help a Friend

Sometimes it’s hard to know what to do or say if a friend has been a victim of crime. Understand that your friend is probably dealing with many different emotions and might not know how to talk about it either. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Information for Parents of Teens

Teens are very vulnerable to crime and unfortunately become victims of crime more than any other age group. They experience all the same crimes that adults do—from robbery, sexual assault, and car theft, to relationship violence, assaults and bullying. How you— and other adults—respond can make a big difference in how your child copes with and recovers from the event. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Men and Sexual Trauma

At least 10% of men in our country have suffered from trauma as a result of sexual assault. Like women, men who experience sexual assault may suffer from depression, PTSD, and other emotional problems as a result. However, because men and women have different life experiences due to their different gender roles, emotional symptoms following trauma can look different in men than they do in women. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Nightmares

Nightmares refer to elaborate dreams that cause high levels of anxiety or terror (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). When nightmares occur in the context of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), they tend to involve the original threatening or horrifying set of circumstances that was involved during the traumatic event. This factsheet offers a brief discussion of both psychological treatments and psychopharmacological treatments (e.g., medicines). Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Criminal victimization can cause both short-term and long-term stress reactions. When a person survives a crisis such as a violent crime, there may be residual trauma and stress reactions. Many people who experience long-term stress reactions continue to function. Those who are unable to function within a normal range, or have difficulties may be suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD can occur at any age.. The estimated prevalence of PTSD among adult Americans is 7.8%, with women (10.4%) twice as likely as men (5%) to have PTSD at some point in their lives. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

PTSD and Physical Health

Exposure to traumatic events such as military combat, physical and sexual abuse, and natural disaster, can be related to poor physical health. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is also related to health problems. This fact sheet provides information on the relationships between trauma, PTSD, and physical health; specific health problems associated with PTSD; health-risk behaviors and PTSD; mechanisms that help explain how PTSD and physical health could be related; and a clinical agenda to address PTSD and health. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD and Problems with Alcohol Use

PTSD does not automatically cause problems with alcohol use; there are many people with PTSD who do not have problems with alcohol. However, PTSD and alcohol together can be serious trouble for the trauma survivor and his or her family. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD and Relationships

Those who develop PTSD may experience lasting problems in their intimate and family relationships or close friendships. PTSD involves symptoms that interfere with trust, emotional closeness, communication, responsible assertiveness, and effective problem solving. In seeking treatment, is it best to find a professional with expertise in both PTSD and in treating couples or families. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD and the Family

Traumatic experiences that happen to one member of a family can affect everyone else in the family. When trauma reactions are severe and go on for some time without treatment, they can cause major problems in a family. This fact sheet will describe family members' reactions to the traumatic event and to the survivor's symptoms and behaviors. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD in Children and Adolescents

The diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was formally recognized as a psychiatric diagnosis in 1980. At that time, little was known about what PTSD looked like in children and adolescents. This fact sheet provides information regarding what events cause PTSD in children, how many children develop PTSD, risk factors associated with PTSD, what PTSD looks like in children, other effects of trauma on children, treatment for PTSD, and what you can do for your child. Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Rape-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Traumatic events such as rape cause both short-term and long-term stress reactions. Many people who experience long-term stress reactions continue to function at optimal levels. Those who are unable to function at a normal range or have difficulties in one or more areas may have Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This bulletin discusses Rape-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (RR-PTSD), a form of PTSD suffered by sexual assault and rape victims. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Rights of Crime Victims

Historically, the American criminal justice system was patterned primarily after the English judicial system. One significant difference has been the manner in which criminal prosecutions are viewed. Traditionally, criminal prosecutions in England were private actions brought by the victim or a representative of the victim. While this was also true during the American colonial period, the new United States of America soon moved to a tradition of public prosecution, undertaken by a public official -- the prosecuting attorney. In the United States, a crime is considered to have been committed against the state -- in other words, against society as a whole -- rather than solely against a victim. One especially unfortunate result of our system is that victims have been treated as evidence against the accused, usually included only as a witness to the crime committed against them. Since the crime is considered to have been committed against the state, and it is the state's job to prosecute, victims are not even recognized as a party to the case. Thus, they have had little or no involvement in the process of bringing offenders to justice. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Legislative Topics

Sexual Assault

In 1992, the National Women’s Study estimated that 683,000 adult American women are forcibly raped each year (National Center for Victims of Crime & Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, 1992). According to Bureau of Justice Statistics data, U.S. male and female residents age 12 and older experienced an estimated 307,000 rapes and sexual assaults in 1996 (Ringel, 1997). The difference between the number of rapes in 1992 and the number of rapes and sexual assaults in 1996 reflects standard statistical error and differences in methodology. One significant methodological difference is that the National Women’s Study interviewed individuals by telephone, allowing women greater confidence in their anonymity. The Bureau of Justice Statistics conducted face-to-face interviews, in some cases with entire families present, which could have possibly deterred disclosure. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Sexual Assault Information for Teens

For sexual activity to be okay, it must be consensual-which means that both people want it to happen. Sexual assault is when any person forces you to participate in a sexual act when you don't want to. This can include touching or penetrating the vagina, mouth or anus of the victim (often called rape), touching the penis of the victim, or forcing the victim to touch the attacker's vagina, penis, or anus. Touching can mean with a hand, finger, mouth, penis, or just about anything else, including objects. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Sleep and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Sleep problems can be a normal response to past trauma or anticipated threat. Sleep disturbances such as difficulty falling asleep, waking frequently, and having distressing dreams or nightmares are among the problems common for those with PTSD Read More...

From the Series: The National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Stalking Information for Teens

Stalking is a pattern of behavior that makes you feel afraid, nervous, harassed, or in danger. It is when someone repeatedly contacts you, follows you, sends you things, talks to you when you don't want them to, or threatens you. The legal definition of stalking and possible punishment for it changes from state to state. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" Bulletins for Teens

Teen Dating Violence

This information packet has been developed by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) as an introduction to the dynamics, prevalence and consequences of teen dating violence. The packet explores issues specific to teen dating violence, examines current provision of support services for teens and presents information about a variety of promising prevention and intervention strategies. While some awareness materials such as booklets, checklists and posters are included, the intent of packet contents is to examine some of the key dating violence issues currently facing teens and their advocates. Read More...

From the Series: National Resource Center on Domestic Violence

Trauma of Victimization

he trauma of victimization is a direct reaction to the aftermath of crime. Crime victims suffer a tremendous amount of physical and psychological trauma. The primary injuries victims suffer can be grouped into three distinct categories: physical, financial and emotional. When victims do not receive the appropriate support and intervention in the aftermath of the crime, they suffer "secondary" injuries. Read More...

From the Series: NCVC "Get Help" General Information

Supporting Survivors

Advice for supporters and significant others when someone says "I was raped." Read More...

From the Series: Men Can Stop Rape

What Men Can Do

All men can play a vital role in rape prevention. Here are a few of the ways. Read More...

From the Series: Men Can Stop Rape
Related Links

Resource Guide
Guide to Survivor Services
[Go to the Service Map]


The Resource Guide is a free information service from The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault.

If you know of a resource for sexual assault survivors which should be included in the Guide, please tell us about it.


Council Member Julissa Ferreras speaking out against teen dating and sexual violence
Council Member Julissa Ferreras speaking out against teen dating and sexual violence